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limits to the cert discussed in congress. the ruling is narrow and only washington is the work not known. it's unequivocal that congress intended at the time frames put in their in the court overturned on something called the chevron part 1 or part 2 test. the will of the branch was explicit in the court overturned the will of the elected on a very narrow crown and sent it back. >> ms.: come you mention one word we trade to get through, which was on sequencing. the lack thereof perhaps inspires how the cftc has handled matters versus how the ftc has handled matters. do it elaborate on that? >> shortcoming thank you for the question. the cftc more than any global regulator in the world has attempted to meet the 2012 deadline for derivatives reform. but in doing so they've assembled a confluence of rules that although affect it at the same time in the next few weeks. the contrast that to the ftc's approach would be provided to the market a sequencing plan conditioned on certain foundational roles such as what product definition, some payment the sec digerati with the cftc and definitions
between washington, d.c. and new york prefer to take the train. it's not because that is always cheaper. because the service is not. it's because of the time savings and convenience. >> mr. boardman, for the northeast corridor, 80% of the population lives within 25 miles of the northeast corridor making the rail very, very accessible. how would you compare that with california? >> depends on the part of california. one of the things i can answer is, congressman, is that the air rail service between san diego and l.a. is entirely real because it just doesn't work the way that that has, as close as the arts which have and the way that it operates. but when you get to something like l.a. to san francisco you really only have the coast starlight. so there's a sufficient amount of data that would really tell you what really happened here. so from that regard, the old drink am anna karenina right now what they called it, i guess it was the coast daylight, was the primary way they moved up until 15 years ago between san francisco and l.a., and it was probably the most profitable of the private
, who were in washington. .. >> what they had was not enough. either in benghazi or the overwhelming numbers. frankly, the state department had not given security for personal resources it needed. on that note, let me ask admiral mullen in regards to the specific findings. >> thank you, mr. ambassador, i appreciate that. i do appreciate your leadership throughout this process as well. good afternoon. the board found that the attacks on benghazi were security related. responsibility for the loss of life committee injuries, and damage to u.s. facilities rest completely and solely with the terrorists who conducted the attacks. that does not mean that there are lessons to be learned. the board found that the security posture at the special mission compound was inadequate for the threat environment in benghazi, and in fact, grossly inadequate to deal with the attacks that took place that night. state department bureau that was supporting benghazi had not taken on security is a shared responsibility. so that support the proposed needed was often lacking and let to the working level to res
to shirley from palm beach florida. surely come thanks for joining us on the "washington journal". >> caller: good morning. i worked in mental health services around 20 years after it raised my family and myself. twenty years of that was then ejected. in the hospitals. i suffer from depression. and i found that i have allergies. there is a book and he talks about how allergies can affect us so severely that it can cause things like depression, retardation, epilepsy and many physical ailments as well. hypertension and hyperglycemia and etc. and it is hard and people look at me like i'm crazy. and i say, look at your diet. many people believe that schizophrenia can be cured by diet? >> host: congressman? >> guest: there are a lot of things that go into this. you people have food reactions and supplements that can affect them? yes. as a cause of schizophrenia, i don't know. i don't want people to think that if only i change my diet, it will go away. there are a lot of other issues there. there are genetic issues, environmental issues, many other aspects here. working with this for 35 years, wor
's going on. we've conveyed very frankly, candidly to the chinese in both washington d.c. and beijing in my case. >> in beijing, what is the view that you can tell of kim jong-un about what power he has, who he is, what its capabilities are to stay in north korea? >> the chinese believe we need to give north korea a chance in and develop economically. china would like all the parties that are part of the six party talks to get back to the table and to see if we can't encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold and abiding by their international obligations. so that's a difference of opinion as strategy. china believes we have to engage with north korea. the united states does every time to try to engage with north korea, they basically turned around and fail to respond to their promises and live up to promises and it gets us nowhere. we don't believe we should reward bad behavior. he knocked what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you everyday? what are they looking for? >> they want gr
. there are no awards, there are no commemorative statues, all he has in his offices are pictures of washington and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark o
about, it was not a priority for washington. special mission was not a priority for washington when it came to security related requests. especially those related to staffing. i want to understand who washington is. and in that frame of mind i think the secretary brings out a number of question. i know secretary clinton visited libya in october 20 of them. did the security situation come up with during her visit there, whether it was a country thing or in her interaction with the libyans? >> senator, i'm sure in general terms that it did. i wasn't on the trips i don't know specifically. i can speak to my own experience. i've also visited libya -- >> in july? >> i visited in july but i also visited in september after the attack on benghazi. so i can speak to my own experience. you know, went secretary clinton said all of his senior leaders in the department are accountable and responsible for what happened at it certainly felt myself. ihop the remains of my former colleagues back after the attack in benghazi. had been in the middle east on a trip and cut short to come back with them.
been immersed in the politics of washington washington from one in the pennsylvania avenue to the other, we have never seen it this dysfunctional. the dysfunction is that a critical mass and we felt we had to speak out about how the problem is and is the book says even worse than it looks. it never looks good and we have to talk about who is at fault in what we can do to get out of it. half the book is about how we been get out of this mess. >> the argument basically is twofold. one, we have now polarized political parties. internally, homogeneous, very much at loggerheads, much like elementary parties, the eminently oppositional. they have to work in a constitutional system based on separation of powers and checks and balances. the mismatch between our parties and our governing institutions is problem number one. problem number two, which is the toughest thing for us to say, and for many people to hear, is that the parties are not equally implicated in this. we have something called asymmetric polarization in which the republican party has in recent years become almost a radical insurg
deathdealing negotiations in washington. mike allen also interviews marco rubio. they discuss the budget and taxes in the future of the republican party. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to playbook breakfast. thank you for coming out so early. we are excited to have an amazing doubleheader today. we are going to talk to senator rubio last night gave one of the first formal speeches to the head to the future of the republican party. we'll talk to senator rubio about that. next we have bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be in just a second. first, welcome to people in lifestream land. will be taking your questions on hash tag political practice. welcome c-span, welcome others who are watching. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year including the conventions so we're very excited to bring the sensitive conversations about the issues driving washington thanks to the bank of america. thank you to your colleagues. you may have
adjourned >> "washington journal" starts at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> you do not always find many newspaper editors embracing this type of reporting. it's not just economics. it is the discomfort that investigative reporting causes in the newsroom. it is about more than economics. it's those people running into complaints of the publisher. and their stories are common over the years. people who are working for the strong upright in that area. >> the pulitzer prize-winning team will take your calls and e-mails and tweets next month on the in depth. they began their collaborative work in the 70s with the co-authors of eight books. the latest, the betrayal of the american dream. watch live at noon eastern on january 6 on c-span2. from the texas book festival american tapestry. the story of the background of michele obama. this is about 45 minutes. >> good evening. welcome. it is a delight to have you here, rachel, and to have all of you here. it's a lovely summer evening, and it is getting hot out there. summer will
retirement benefits imaginable, they have come here to washington, d.c., to tell congress that we should cut social security benefits for disabled veterans, raise taxes on low-income workers. so let me just tell you what some call a tweak would do. in terms of the chained c.p.i., more than 3.2 million disabled veterans receive disability compensation from the veterans administration. 3.2 million veterans, they would see a reduction, a significant reduction in their benefits. under the chained c.p.i., a disabled veteran who started receiving v.a. disability benefits at age 30 would have their benefits cut by more than $1,400 at age 45, $2,300 at age 55 and $3,200 at age 65. does anybody in their right mind think that the american people want to see benefits cut for men and women who sacrificed, who lost limbs defending their country? are we going to balance the budget on their backs? i challenge anyone who supports a chained c.p.i. to go to walter reed hospital, visit with the men and women who have lost their legs, lost their arms, lost their eyesight as a result of their service in afghanis
to represent the nation's second largest state in the u.s. senate. kay came to washington ready to work. she established herself early on as a leader on transportation and nasa and as a fighter for lower taxes and smaller, smarter government. kay won a claim as an advocate for science and competitiveness, helped secure bipartisan support for the landmark america competes act, and she became known throughout the state for the close attention she paid to constituents. shortly after her election to the senate, kay began a tradition imitated by many others since of holding weekly constituent meetings over coffee whenever the senate's in session. the groups usually ranged in size from 100-150, and at any given coffee, you might come across families in bermuda shorts, bankers in pinstripes or college football players. over the years, kay has hosted about 50,000 people in her office through these coffees, but her attention to constituent service goes well beyond that. back home, she is one of the few politicians in texas who has actually visited all 254 counties, some of which are home to more catt
-income families look at washington and don't see enough progress on jobs, frankly, and folks coming together. i think they will. until they see that, they have a sense there is something substantial that's decided that affects their lives, they're going to be very uncertain. i hear this from taxpayers, i also hear a lot about uncertainty from small business owners. and at the same time we have something we can do about it. or i should say the house has something they can do it about it right now. we passed in the senate this summer in july, i guess it was july 24, a tax cut for middle-class families, meaning we would continue the tax rates for those families. that kind of certainty is badly needed right now. so one of the best things that could rap right now is the house could vote and the president would sign into law legislation that would provide certainty for middle-class families. 98% of american families, and some 97% of small businesses. so it's time for the house to act. secondly, i think we have to take steps to make sure that we're creating jobs at a faster pace, as i mentioned before
of the world. dan, my dear friend and colleague, you will be missed in washington as much as you will be missed in hawaii. rest in peace. god bless you and your spirit. mr. president, i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from north carolina. mrs. hagan: i ask unanimous consent the help committee be discharged from further consideration of s. 3472 and the senate proceed to its immediate consideration. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: s. 3472, a bill to amend the family educational rights and privacy act of 1974, to provide improvements to such act. the presiding officer: without objection. the committee is discharged. the senate will proceed to the measure. mrs. hagan: i further ask that the landrieu substitute amendment which is at the desk be agreed to, the bill as amended be read a third time and passed, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table, with no intervening action or debate, and that any statements relating to the measure be printed at the appropriate place in the record as if read. the presiding officer: without
of the university of indianapolis and helping that institution establish a washington internship program. i look forward to announcing additional endeavors of service in the coming weeks. my service in the senate would not have been possible without the encouragement and the constant support of my loving wife, shar, our four sons, mark, bob, john and david, and the entire lugar family, most of which is with us here in the galleries today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i'm also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate, including, by my count, more than 300 senators, hundreds of personal and committee staff members, and more than a thousand student interns. in my experience, it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote one's self to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best, the senate is one of the founders' most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united s
such great work on this measure over many months, as well as to senator cantwell of washington and other colleagues who have cosponsored this measure, including senators collins, feinstein, gillibrand, kerry, landrieu, merkley, mikulski, murray, vitter, and wyden. they are tireless animal advocates, and this bill is indeed, the amendment as well, are about ending animal fighting, which plainly and simply is a blood sport. it is something that is cruel and inhumane. it leaves animals scarred and disabled. and it is associated with many other criminal activities. people who attend animal fights are often also engaged in drug dealing, extortion, assault, a variety of criminal activities, and the enabling activity is animal fighting. and that is why this bill increases the penalties for knowingly -- knowingly -- attending an animal fight with a child and, indeed, makes it a crime to knowingly attend an animal fight. so these penalties -- stricter penalties for bringing a child knowingly and criminal penalties of up to a year imprisonment or a fine or both for knowingly attending an animal fi
controversial is the most things were. designed washington said he was competition and he submitted a design for a palace. americans aren't having a palace. it was not particularly awe-inspiring. in fact, in 1821, a diplomat told the congress is neither large nor awe-inspiring, but the answer the congressman gave said that building that its purpose if it were larger or more elegant, perhaps some president would be declined to become a permanent resident. >> olympia snowe retiring after serving three terms in the senate. she spoke on the senate floor today for about 40 minutes. >> i rise today with an infinite appreciation for the institution of the united states senate as well is the profound sense of gratitude as i prepare to conclude my 18 years in the senate and may nearly 40 years in elective office on behalf of the people of name. madam president, it's been difficult to envision the day when i would be saying farewell to the senate. just as it was impossible to imagine i would one day become the united states senate rss is growing at a name. but such is the miracle of america that a you
tv.org. >> washington post correspondent and author, the newest book "little america, the war within the war for afghanistan." mr. chandrasekaran, when you talk about the little war, what are you talking about? >> the communities built in southern afghanistan, not in the last couple years, but six decades ago back when unknown to most of the country mern, there were dozen of americans engineers there back in the 40s and 50s, digging canals, building dams, helping to nation build in afghanistan, and the very same terrain that president obama's troops surge unfolded in over the last couple years. in my history of obama's serge and examination of it, i actually start back in the 1940s in the remarkable period of american resistance to afghanistan, a period of great optimism when we built the town there that the afghans started to call little america, complete with a co-ed high school, a swimming pool where boys and girls swam together, a clubhouse to get a gin and tonic, and it was a period of great promise for the americans and afghans, and i use that as the opening for this book that talks ab
in washington, d.c. so consumed by fear and hatred of the nra and american gun owners that you're willing to accept a world where real resistance to evil monsters is alone, unarmed school principal left to surrender her life, her life to shield those children in her care? no one, no one regardless of personal political prejudice has the right to impose that sacrifice. ladies and gentlemen, there's no national, one-size-fits-all solution to protecting our children. but do know this president zeroed out school emergency planning grants in last year's budget and scrapped secure our schools policing grants in next year's budget. with all the foreign aid the united states does, with all the money in the federal budget, can't we afford to put a police officer in every single school? even if they did that, politicians have no business and no authority denying us the right, the ability and the moral imperative to protect ourselves and our loved ones from harm. now, the national rifle association knows there are millions of qualified active and retired police. active reserve and retired military.
economy has is right here in washington and our inability to get together across party lines to bring our country back into fiscal balance and to show the country and the world that we have a political system here that is capable of fixing our problems. bob -- earlier this year, bob carr, foreign minister of australia -- one of our greatest allies in the world -- said -- and i quote -- that "the united states is one budget deal away from restoring its global preeminence." the u.s. is one budget deal away from restoring its global preeminence, perhaps because some -- i'm so proud of this country, i'd say we're one budget deal away from restoring our global dominance for a considerable number of years. unfortunately, after i hope and pray we adopt the result of the negotiations going on now and avoid the fiscal cliff, we'll still be one grand bargain, budget deal away from restoring our -- our global preeminence. that work has to be done. but at least we will have avoided the cliff. mr. president, by a twist of fate, the occupant of the chair is my colleague and friend, the senator from con
discussion today. i don't know that we've come to any conclusion, but that makes us fit right into washington on this topic. so we thank you all for coming. before you leave, i want to do a shameless plug for a new timeline, video timeline that is going to be posted today on our kaiser family foundation web site. it's sort of a fun, quick way to get a little bit of history on medicare. so for those of you who are looking for a fun way to learn about the program, i think you would find it educational, and it's short and brief. and i know everybody likes that. so i want to thank ed for hosting this discussion today and thank our panelists for coming and sharing your thoughts on this perspective, and i leave it to ed for any final comments. >> only one thing. two things, actually. one is to fill out those evaluations and, second, to manifest what tricia was talking about by joining me in thanking our panel for this great discussion today. [applause] and for doing so well, we're going to free you from the obligation to come to any more alliance seminars this year. [laughter] >> happy new year. >>
, the u.s. washington on their way to capture them. this is probably produced by an abolitionist artist sometime after the actual voyage. so what we have here is a very important case in the struggle against slavery, important because it was a victory. this kind of thing was not common. the institution of slavery was extremely strong. abolitionists and enslaved africans won a very significant victory in this case. okay. so, this subject has been much stud yesterday, -- studied, and it's been well studied. so you may wonder, why write a new become about it? my interest in this case grew out of the previous book i wrote, entitled, "the slave ship, a human history." published in 2007. this was a pretty gruesome subject to study, i tell you. very pantoufle see what was done to so many millions of africans in the pursuit of profits. the terror that was crucial to the management of people on board these vessels. i had to live with this for several years while writing this book, and as i studied the slave ship, what i found was there were a great many rebelons that rode up under the most extre
to their homes and neighborhoods. now, as new yorkers we've been reading the stories, but the rest of washington, stories of heartbreak are unimaginable. the most heartbreaking story was when i went to staten island and we -- we met with first responders whose job was to find two children. what happened in this case was a mother was worried because she had lost power and her husband told her to find a different place to stay with the children and urged her to go to brooklyn to see her mother. she took the children in the car. would have been staten island as the storm surge was so severe. a 10-foot wave came across the road she took her children out of the car, tried to get to higher land and they were taken from her arms. these children were two years old and four years old and the mother could do nothing because the storm is so strong. she is just one story of many families who lost their lives because of the storm. i can tell you our mayor and governor worked so hard to evacuate families. they evacuated families all across new york and that's one of the reasons why the lost life was as low as
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